Appointments and Honours, Fall 2009

Friday, December 4, 2009 11:00:00 AM




Other awards:

BARRY ADAMS AND JIM WALLACE ELECTED FELLOWS OF THE ENGINEERING INSTITUTE OF CANADA
Environmental researchers Barry Adams, Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering and graduate faculty member in the Centre for Environment, and Jim Wallace, Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, were among the U of T recipients elected fellows of the Engineering Institute of Canada in recognition of exceptional contributions to engineering in Canada.  Professor Adams has conducted innovative research on urban water resource infrastructure system planning and design, while Professor Wallace is an internationally known researcher in the area of alternative fuels used in internal combustion engines. A federation of technical societies, the Engineering Institute of Canada is the leading proponent of continuing education and technical professional development in the Canadian engineering community.
     Recipients were presented with their awards at a Gala held on 7 March 2009 in Ottawa.
(This is an edited excerpt of an article found at http://www.news.utoronto.ca.)

For more information, please visit:
http://www.civil.engineering.utoronto.ca/infoabout/staff/professors/adams.htm;
http://www.mie.utoronto.ca/faculty/wallace.html; http://www.eic-ici.ca/

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BARRY ADAMS AND BILL VANDERBURG ELECTED FELLOWS OF THE ENGINEERING ACADEMY OF CANADA
Environmental researchers Barry Adams, Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering and graduate faculty member in the Centre for Environment, and Bill Vanderburg, Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering and Centre for Environment were among the U of T recipients recently elected fellows of the Canadian Academy of Engineering.  Professor Adams has conducted innovative research on urban water resource infrastructure system planning and design.  Professor Vanderburg studies technology, society, biosphere interactions and their application to the development of preventive approaches for the engineering, management and regulation of modern technology. The Canadian Academy of Engineering comprises many of the country's most accomplished engineers, who have expressed their dedication to the application of science and engineering principles in the interests of the country and its enterprises. The awards were presented at the academy's annual general meeting on July 13, 2009 in Calgary.
(This is an edited excerpt of an article found at http://www.news.utoronto.ca.)

For more information, please visit: http://www.civil.engineering.utoronto.ca/infoabout/staff/professors/adams.htm;
http://www.civil.engineering.utoronto.ca/infoabout/staff/professors/vanderburg.htm; http://www.acad-eng-gen.ca/

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GRANT ALLEN ELECTED FELLOW OF AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE
Environmental researcher Grant Allen, Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry and graduate faculty member in the Centre for Environment, was one of five U of T researchers elected as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world's largest general science society and publisher of the prestigious journal Science. The Fellows were recognized for their contributions to science and technology at the Fellows Forum held on February 14 2009 during the AAAS Annual Meeting in Chicago.  Dr. Allen is cited for the use of biological processes to treat air emissions and wastewater and for service to the profession of chemical engineering.
(This is an edited excerpt of an article found at http://www.news.utoronto.ca.)

For more information, please visit: http://chem-eng.utoronto.ca/~allendg/; http://www.aaas.org/


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ROBERT ANDREWS RECIPIENT OF THE 2009 GEORGE WARREN FULLER AWARD
Robert Andrews, Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering and graduate faculty member at the Centre for Environment, is the recipient of the 2009 George Warren Fuller Award, the Ontario Water Works Association's highest honour.  The award is given for distinguished service to the water supply field and in commemoration of the sound engineering skill, brilliant diplomatic talent and constructive leadership.  Professor Andrews received the award during the association's annual conference in May 2009 in Toronto. The Ontario Water Works Association is a voluntary organization of water professionals dedicated to protecting public health through the delivery of safe, sufficient and sustainable drinking water in Ontario.
(This is an edited excerpt of an article found at http://www.news.utoronto.ca.)

For more information, please visit: http://www.civ.utoronto.ca/water; http://www.owwa.com

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ELIZABETH EDWARDS RECIPIENT OF NSERC SYNERGY AWARD FOR INNOVATION
Elizabeth Edwards
, Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, is the winner of the 2009 Synergy Award for Innovation in the category of partnership with a large company. The award, announced Oct. 19 in Ottawa by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), honours outstanding achievements of university-industry collaboration. Dr. Edwards received a $200,000 NSERC research grant for her win. 
     Dr. Edwards was recognized for her highly successful partnership with Geosyntec, a multinational consulting firm that helps clients with new projects and complicated issues involving the environment, natural resources and civil infrastructure.  The partnership has resulted in innovative solutions that are improving the efficiency of contaminated site clean-up. 
     Dr. Edwards' research group examines how biological processes affect the fate of pollutants in the environment and how novel types of bacteria that grow in unusual conditions can help naturally detoxify harmful chemicals often found in groundwater.  With Geosyntec, the researchers created a bioremediation treatment that destroys contaminants caused by two of the world's most common and persistent pollutants - a common dry-cleaning agent (perchloroethene) and a degreasing solvent (trichloroethene). The process has been successfully used to decontaminate hundreds of global sites, is cheaper than traditional remedies, uses less energy and works more quickly.
(This is an edited excerpt of an article found at http://www.news.utoronto.ca.)

For more information, please visit: http://chem-eng.utoronto.ca/~biodegraders/;
http://www.nserc-crsng.gc.ca/Prizes-Prix/Synergy-Synergie/Index-Index_eng.asp

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BRYAN KARNEY, DOUG REEVE AND DAVID ZINGG RECEIVE 2009 U OF T AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE
Northrop Frye Award recipient: Bryan Karney
, Chair of the Division of Environmental Engineering and Energy Systems and graduate faculty member in the Centre for Environment.  This award recognizes those who have gone above and beyond the University's standard of excellence, setting themselves apart through innovation in teaching and their commitment to conveying the excitement and importance of research to undergraduate and graduate students. Professor Karney's research interests include: hydraulics and water resources systems analysis; transient, steady state and water quality analysis of complex pipe systems and networks; design and optimization of pipeline and water supply systems; physical and numerical modelling of water resource systems; and social implications of technology.
Carolyn Tuohy Impact on Public Policy Award recipient: Doug Reeve, Chair of the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry and graduate faculty member in the Centre for Environment.  This award is presented to a member of the U of T  teaching staff whose scholarship has had a significant impact on public policy.  Professor Reeve has recently focused his attention on engineering education; student leadership development, and engineering and public policy.
Faculty award recipient: David Zingg, Director, U of T Institute for Aerospace Studies.  The Faculty Award is presented to a member of the University of Toronto teaching staff who consistently demonstrates excellence in both teaching and research endeavours.  One of his research areas focuses on the development of ultra-low-drag aircraft with reduced contribution to climate change. 

For more information, please visit: http://www.energy.engineering.utoronto.ca/; http://www.chem-eng.utoronto.ca/facultystaff/profs/reeve.htm; http://goldfinger.utias.utoronto.ca/~dwz; http://alumni.utoronto.ca/s/731/index.aspx?sid=731&gid=1&pgid=663


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DAVID MARTELL RECEIVES 2009 CANADIAN OPERATIONAL RESEARCH SOCIETY'S AWARD OF MERIT
David Martell
, Professor in the Faculty of Forestry and graduate faculty member at the Centre for Environment, is the recipient of the 2009 Award of Merit, given by the Canadian Operational Research Society (CORS) in recognition of significant contributions to the profession of operational research.  Dr. Martell was cited for his "outstanding contributions to the development and application of operational research in forest management in Canada and the world and for his many contributions to the Canadian Operational Research Society".  His current research interests include the application of operational research and information technology to fire and forest management and the development of decision support systems for fire and forest managers. He received the award June 16, 2009 during the joint international meeting of CORS and the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences in Toronto.
(This is an edited excerpt of an article found at http://www.news.utoronto.ca.)

For more information, please visit http://www.firelab.utoronto.ca/; http://www.cors.ca/


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ERIC MILLER RECEIVES WILBUR SMITH DISTINGUISHED TRANSPORTATION EDUCATOR AWARD
Eric Miller
, Director of the U of T Cities Centre, Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering, and graduate faculty member at the Centre for Environment, is this year's recipient of the Wilbur Smith Distinguished Transportation Educator Award of the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE), given to recognize a professor who has made an outstanding contribution to the transportation profession by relating academic studies to the actual practice of transportation. Dr. Miller developed the "GTA Model" used by the municipal government to forecast regional travel demand.  He received the award during the institute's annual meeting, held August, 2009 in San Antonio, Texas.
(This is an edited excerpt of an article from the University of Toronto Bulletin, Sept 29, 2009 issue.)

For more information, please visit
http://www.citiescentre.utoronto.ca/

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RICHARD PELTIER FIRST CANADIAN TO WIN PRESTIGIOUS INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE PRIZE
University Professor Richard Peltier
of physics has been chosen by the Franklin Institute to receive the 2010 Bower Award and Prize for Achievement in Science, to be awarded during a ceremony in Philadelphia April 29, 2010.  Dr. Peltier is the first Canadian to receive the $250,000 award and joins a group of previous recipients that includes Marie Curie, Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking.  The Bower Award recognizes Dr. Peltier for fundamental advances in the understanding of Earth systems and for demonstrating profound interconnections between surface climate variability and the internal properties and dynamics of the solid Earth. Founder of the Centre for Global Change Science at U of T, Dr. Peltier is known worldwide for his work in global climate change. He has developed powerful models using sophisticated mathematical concepts to depict what has happened to our climate over the past 600 million years and what is likely to happen far into the future if human behaviour does not change. His models are considered the gold standard for researchers trying to understand climate change.  Dr. Peltier's achievements have been recognized with many of the top honours in his field, including the 2004 Vetlesen Prize, often called the Nobel Prize of earth sciences.  He is also listed among the most highly cited earth scientists in the world from 1991 to 2001, is a fellow in the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters and a recipient of the Royal Society of Canada's Bancroft Award to name but a few honours. Peltier is also a dedicated mentor and teacher. More than 30 doctoral students have received their PhD degrees under his supervision. 
(This is an edited excerpt of an article found at http://www.news.utoronto.ca.)

For more information, please visit: http://www.fi.edu/franklinawards; http://www.atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca/~peltier/; http://www.cgcs.utoronto.ca

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ANDRÉ SIMPSON RECEIVES ROYAL SOCIETY OF CHEMISTRY ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AWARD
Andre Simpson, Professor in the Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences at U of T Scarborough, is the 2008 recipient of the Royal Society of Chemistry Environmental Science Award, offered jointly by SETAC (Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry) and the Royal Society of Chemistry for early to mid-career scientists who have accomplished and published outstanding contributions that have advanced the understanding or development of environmental systems, technologies, methodologies or other relevant research in the environmental sciences. Simpson has published more than 50 reference articles since his first journal publication in 2000, contributed to 10 book chapters and been published frequently in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. Simpson is most known for his research with hyphenated nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, especially dealing with structure, interactions and reactivity of natural organic matter. In 2004, he co-founded the Environmental Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Centre at the University of Toronto-Scarborough, a first of its kind in Canada. He was recently ranked in the "Ten to Watch for 2008" by The Toronto Star.
     Professor Simpson is also a graduate faculty member at the Centre for Environment and supervises students in the Centre's Master of Environmental Science program.
(This is an edited excerpt of articles found at http://www.news.utoronto.ca and http://www.setac.org)

For more information, please visit http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/~asimpson; http://www.setac.org


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SUSTAINABILITY OFFICE'S REWIRE PROJECT WINS CAUBO QUALITY & PRODUCTIVITY AWARD
The U of T Sustainability Office's Rewire project has been awarded third prize in the national category of the Canadian Association of University Business Officers' (CAUBO) Quality and Productivity Awards 2009.  The Rewire project aims to empower students, staff and faculty to reduce their energy consumption through small behaviour changes with high environmental impact.  Project coordinators and community members work closely to develop strategies catered to the culture and behavioral patterns of building residents. Over 3,000 staff and students in eight buildings have been engaged in energy conservation as participants and coordinators in the project on St. George campus.  CAUBO promotes the professional and effective delivery of services and administration of resources in all facets of higher education.  This annual awards program is designed to recognize, reward and share achievements of administrators in the introduction of new services, improvement in the quality of services provided, and the management of human, financial, and physical resources.
(This is an edited excerpt of an article found at http://www.sustainability.utoronto.ca)

For more information, please visit http://sustainability.utoronto.ca/projects/rewire.