Alan H. Weatherley Graduate Fellowship in Environmental Leadership established in memory of UofT Zoology Professor committed to environmental issues

Monday, November 9, 2015 9:30:00 AM



Alan Weatherley

The School of the Environment is pleased to announce a new graduate scholarship: the Alan H. Weatherley Graduate Fellowship in Environmental Leadership. 

Thanks to a generous donation by Robena C. Weatherley, this fellowship has been established to honour the memory of her husband, Professor Emeritus Alan H. Weatherley, and to reflect his personal interest, deep concern and life-long commitment to environmental issues.  The fellowship will be awarded annually to a PhD student enrolled in one of the School of the Environment’s graduate programs who demonstrates exceptional academic and/or practical leadership in the area of environmental issues. 

Alan Weatherley (1928-2012) was Professor of Zoology at the University of Toronto from 1975 to 1993. He was the author of more than 75 research articles and three books on fisheries biology, and continued to work in conservation after his retirement. Recipients of the fellowship will receive a copy of his 2012 book titled A Conservationist Perspective.

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Click here for award information, eligibility, requirements, and application deadline.

 

Biography of Alan Weatherley

ALAN WEATHERLEY (1928-2012) was Professor of Zoology at the University of Toronto (1975-93) until his retirement in 1993. He previously taught biology at the University of Tromsø (1973-74) and Australian National University (1961-73). He was the author of more than 75 research articles, published between 1950 and 1994, and three books on fisheries biology. He received his BSc from Sydney University in 1949, MSc from the University of Tasmania in 1959, and PhD from the University of Glasgow in 1961. Much of his early learning and formative experiences as a scientist are documented in his book, “A Conservationist Perspective,” which he published as Professor Emeritus in 2012. 

Professor Weatherley’s fascination with nature and the great outdoors started early, having been born in scenic Sydney, Australia. After receiving his BSc, he went on to work in the CSIRO’s Fisheries and Oceanography laboratory under the direction of Dr. Aubrey Nicholls. This group was investigating the ecology of Tasmanian trout populations and aquaculture potential. He subsequently received his MSc from the University of Tasmania in 1959 with a thesis titled, “Tasmanian fish cultural studies”; a study of the aquaculture potential of fish in Tasmania. In 1961, he was awarded a PhD from the University of Glasgow for his study on thermal biology of perch (Perca fluviatilis) and the role of the interrenal tissue (source of corticoid hormones) in thermal stress. 

He began his major scientific research in freshwater biology in Tasmania (1951-57), continued in Scotland (1958-60), and subsequently at the Australian National University from 1961-73 where he became a Reader in Zoology. Professor Weatherley took up lectureship in the Department of Zoology at the Australian National University in 1961 where he taught courses in vertebrate biology, comparative physiology and freshwater ecology. 

In 1972, he published his book Growth and Ecology of Fish Populations, which received the Publication Award of the Wildlife Society (USA) and became a Current Contents Citation Classic. In 1973, he moved to the University of TromsØ, Norway, to become Professor of Fisheries Biology, and from 1975-93 he was Professor of Zoology at the University of Toronto. While at U of T, he established a research group that focused on fish growth and metabolic activity. One major success was the development of telemetry to a level of refinement that made it possible to monitor metabolic activity in free-living fish.

Professor Weatherley co-founded the Australian Society for Limnology (ASL) in 1962 and was its President in 1965, was the Secretary of the Ecological Society of Australia, and a member of the Executive Committee of the Great Barrier Reef Committee.

He and his wife, Robena, were active members of Science for Peace for ten years in Toronto, were early members of Washademoak Environmentalists, and were co-founders of the Canaan-Washademoak Watershed Association. They continued to work in conservation after his retirement from the University of Toronto centred around the area where they lived alongside a tributary of the Saint John River, New Brunswick.