U of T anthropologist Malcolm Ramsay asks, "Why didn't the lemur cross the road?"

Friday, June 23, 2017 3:18:56 AM



"'Humans only arrived on Madagascar in the last few thousand years, and since then many large animals like hippos, giant birds, and at least 15 species of lemurs have gone extinct," says Malcolm Ramsay. "The remaining lemurs are mostly endangered and living in rapidly disappearing forests.'"

Ramsay is a PhD student in the Department of Anthropology and the School's Environmental Studies Collaborative Program. His doctoral research looks at the effects of forest fragmentation on endangered mouse lemurs in Ankarafantsika National Park, on the island of Madagascar in Africa. He is the recipient of a 2017 Beatrice and Arthur Minden Graduate Research Fellowship from the School of the Environment, which he says helped to support his travel to Madagascar to do field work on lemur populations in the poorly studied dry forest region.

Find out more about mouse lemurs and their impact on the ecosystem in Madagascar in U of T News: U of T anthropologist Malcolm Ramsay asks, "Why didn't the lemur cross the road?"